[1THING] Blog: Archive for September, 2016

[ Playing the “long game” means protecting the Arctic Ocean from oil spills, reducing climate change ]

Tim Woody

Gov. Bill Walker, Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott and Alaska Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Andy Mack met this week with senior members of the Obama administration, urging them to keep the Arctic Ocean in the upcoming final version of the 2017-2022 federal offshore leasing program.

[ Legal arguments for state takeover of public lands are losers in the courts ]

Michael Reinemer

As reported in an AP story today, a report recently adopted by the Public Lands Subcommittee of the Conference of Western Attorneys General (CWAG) shows there is little legal b

[ Westerners overwhelmingly support commonsense coal reform ]

Caroline Mosley

Yesterday, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced that they had received hundreds of thousands of public comments from Westerners in support of federal coal leasing reform.

[ 7 Tips to Fight Plastic Pollution ]

7 Tips to Fight Plastic Pollution

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thebittenword.com

 

Enormous gyres made up of plastic “soup” have been found in all our oceans. The infamous North Pacific Gyre, also known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, covers an area twice the size of Texas! Meanwhile, plastic chemicals like BPA are endocrine disruptors and, when ingested over time, can cause cancer, birth defects, and behavior problems.

All this plastic is wreaking havoc on our health and environment. Here are some tips from EarthShare members on fighting back against plastic pollution:

Support Bag Fees and Bans. Policy is the most effective tool to fight plastic pollution. Tell your local, state, and federal politicians that you want to dis-incentivize wasteful plastic use. Check out the cities that have already done it.

Put pressure on manufacturers. If you believe a company could be smarter about its packaging, make your voice heard. Write a letter, send a tweet, or give your money to a more sustainable competitor (NRDC).

Volunteer to Cleanup a Waterway. Sign up to participate in one of Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanups or Surfrider Foundation’s Cleanups. It’s a fun (and eye-opening) way to care for your local environment.

Reduce *Before* Recycling. While it’s better than the landfill, recycling plastic isn’t a sustainable solution. Plastic degrades as it’s recycled and is sometimes exported to other countries. Reduce first, then reuse, then recycle (Save Our Shores).

Keep Plastic Out of the Kitchen. Avoid heating plastic containers and use kitchen dishes and implements made of glass, porcelain, wood, and stainless steel instead (CEHN).

BYO (Bring Your Own) Everything. From utensils and mugs to bags and diapers, we can kick the single-use habit by purchasing longer-lasting products meant to be reused (Surfrider Foundation/Earth Island Journal).

[ ReWild Unveils Restoration Options for Mission Bay ]

Mission Bay, San Diego

Mission Bay, San Diego

SAN DIEGO, September 28, 2016 — Last night, ReWild Mission Bay – a project of San Diego Audubon and its partners to enhance and restore up to 170 acres of wetlands in the North East corner of Mission Bay – unveiled eight possible options for restoration. Based on community suggestions from two public workshops earlier this year, the draft plans were presented to more than 135 community members to collect input. To view the potential alternatives, please click here.

“Our community has been very vocal about its support for restoring and protecting this iconic part of San Diego that so many people love and cherish,” said Rebecca Schwartz Lesberg, project manager for ReWild Mission Bay. “These eight designs reflect what the community has asked for and identified as important to keep Mission Bay healthy and enjoyable for all uses and for generations to come.”

The September 27 public workshop was the third in a series of four. ReWild Mission Bay will work with scientists and engineers to determine the feasibility of the eight initial restoration alternatives. Refined versions of the alternatives presented on Tuesday, or combinations of features from several different alternatives, may move forward to become final restoration designs. Residents can expect one more public workshop in late 2016 or early 2017 to weigh in on these designs before they are finalized.

“This is an unprecedented opportunity to protect our communities from sea level rise, expand habitat for endangered birds, help our kids get out in nature, and provide cleaner water for all San Diegans to enjoy in Mission Bay,” said Schwartz.

Through ReWild Mission Bay, San Diego Audubon is facilitating a three-year planning process that includes collecting community input and conceptualizing plans to restore the wetlands along Pacific Beach Drive and on both sides of Rose Creek. By May of 2017, this process will have produced at least three versions of a community-informed, scientifically defensible wetlands restoration plan for the North East corner of Mission Bay. San Diego Audubon is working closely with the City of San Diego, the California State Coastal Conservancy, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, and the University of California’s Natural Reserve System on the effort. Next steps include final approval, environmental review and permitting before the restoration of the area’s wetlands.

Wetlands — including marshes, mud flats, riverbanks and more — play an important role in San Diego’s quality of life, as they attract wildlife, foster a diverse ecosystem, improve water quality and protect communities from flooding by providing a cushion during high tides. Today, only five percent of the historic 4,000 acres of Mission Bay wetlands remain, making ReWild Mission Bay a critical and time-sensitive project for the area.

For more information on ReWild Mission Bay and the project timeline, please visit http://www.rewildmissionbay.org.

[ BLM chooses smart planning in Tres Rios ]

Anastasia Greene

On Monday, September 26, the Colorado Bureau of Land Management state office announced that it will be pursuing a master leasing plan in Southwest Colorado.

[ Clean Power Plan’s day in court: 4 facts you didn’t know ]

Opponents have conceded the EPA has authority, and some other surprising elements about the case.

     

[ New research and academics helping think through economic factors that will shape the future of coal on public lands ]

The workshop, organized by Columbia University, brought together industry analysts, bankers, traders, and credit raters—with a dose of government and academic experts.

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[ National forest trail maintenance legislation passes House ]

Michael Reinemer

Today the House of Representatives approved H.R.

[ The debate questions media can’t afford to ignore ]

Questions about climate and energy policies span all top voter issues, but are usually overlooked during presidential debates.