[1THING] Blog

[ What happens after Bears Ears National Monument’s deadline? ]

In the coming weeks, the Trump administration will review comments, and by June 10th, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will make a recommendation about Bears Ears’ monument status.

[ Trump doesn’t care about climate or these 5 national parks ]

Our parks would benefit from staying in the Paris Agreement, where nearly 200 countries are committed to reduce human-driven emissions and aim to stop the rise of global temperatures.

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[ Unprecedented outpouring of support for Bears Ears shown during official comment period ]

DJ Tyson

Today, a coalition of conservation groups and others announced that a historic number of comments and petitions of support have been submitted to the Department of the Interior in support of Bears Ears National Monument.  Despite the entirely inadequate 15-day period ending on May 26th prov

[ Legal memo: A president does not have the power to revoke a national monument ]

May 25, 2017

A president does not have the power to revoke a national monument

[ 8 Activities You Can Do at National Monuments ]

Stretching from Maine to New Mexico and Utah to Hawaii, America’s national monuments can be found all over the country, and offer the chance to do everything from exploring ruins and discovering dinosaurs to rock climbing and snorkeling.

[ Can psychology influence the way we recycle? ]

If a soda can is crushed, smashed and flattened by you or someone else stepping on it, is your first thought trash or recycle? In a study, Jennifer Argo of the University of Alberta and co-author Remi Trudel of Boston dreamstime_xl_40703788 (2) (640x423)University discovered that when an object loses its original shape, its chances of being recycled collapse. Argo says…”Things that are useful are recycled; they still serve a purpose. In fact, Coke ran a campaign shortly after our first paper on the topic, showing a crushed can and emphasizing it was still recyclable. Educating consumers through promotional techniques as well as highlighting identity would increase recycling.” The point being, just because it looks like trash, doesn’t make it so.

The same goes for disposable coffee cups. Have you ever been to a coffee shop and had your name misspelled on the cup? There is a really good chance that if you have, you did not recycle that cup. When a team of psychologists ran a study, they found that people were significantly more likely to recycle their cup when their names were spelled correctly. The study found that 48% did, as opposed to 26% of those who had no name at all and  24% of those who had a misspell. Jennifer Argo states – “We are averse to trashing something that is tied to our identity,” said Jennifer Argo of the University of Alberta, one of the authors of the study, “as it would be conceptually similar to trashing a part of the self, which makes people more likely to recycle.” So make a conscious effort to think about it next time your in a coffee or juice shop. Whether your name is spelled correctly or not, that cup is recyclable.

To read more about how we can be aware of what we are choosing to and not to recycle without even realizing it, CLICK HERE.

[ Pruitt’s first 100 days at the EPA: His most alarming actions so far ]

In contrast to the often-dysfunctional White House, the EPA administrator has been laser focused.

     

[ Media kit: Bears Ears and broader national monument ‘review’ ]

Michael Reinemer

The Wilderness Society can provide background, commentary and photos on the Trump administration review of Bears Ears and other national monuments across the country.

[ COME TOGETHER: Kids’ Ocean Day 2017 ]

I Love A Clean San Diego once again partnered with the California Coastal Commission for our 19th annual Kids’ Ocean Day. On May 18, 2017, over 900 students, teachers, and volunteers united together to clean up Mission Beach and the surrounding area. These dedicated 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders rallied together from 7 local schools to protect our oceans by collecting thousands of pieces of litter and marine debris. Common items found during the cleanup included small pieces of plastic, snack wrappers, straws, and Styrofoam. The students’ cooperative energy and childlike verve were tangible on the beach that day.

Students from Porter Elementary show off the waste they collected and their shirts decorated with this year’s theme – COME TOGETHER.

Students from Porter Elementary show off the waste they collected and their shirts decorated with this year’s theme – COME TOGETHER.

Following the cleanup, students united with community volunteers to form an aerial art image. One of the most common questions we receive is, “how do you make the aerial art happen?” Here’s a peek behind the curtain:

Each year, I Love A Clean San Diego’s education department designs an aerial art image that follows the statewide theme for all 5 Kids’ Ocean Day partners. On the day of the event, the ILACSD aerial art team assembles before daybreak to produce the much-anticipated image. Equipped with irrigation flags, surveyor’s tape, and extra-long measuring tapes, our amazing staff spend the wee hours of the morning meticulously plotting each and every point of the aerial artwork image. This year’s theme – COME TOGETHER – draws on the power we have when united in our efforts to protect and defend the oceans and coastlines from pollution.

As students began to file into the formation, anticipation was high; everyone was excited to see the helicopter fly overhead, photographer inside, capturing our hard work from the sky. It was a gratifying moment to see all the students, teachers, volunteers, and staff sit in stillness within the image for 10 brief minutes. After months of planning, we were all rewarded with a powerful piece of art so vast it can only be seen from the sky.KAAB2017finalimage

The success of the day could be measured by the faces of the beaming students. They felt a sense of accomplishment from doing their part to help clean up the environment. The students now stand united as true “Scholars for the Sea!”

Kids’ Ocean Day is a magnificent event that helps to bring environmental awareness and stewardship to the forefront of these students’ minds. It is a day of joining forces and demonstrating to the kids what it means to work together as one. The students walked away from Kids’ Ocean Day feeling empowered and armed with the understanding that their personal choices have power and their everyday actions will impact our environment and our future.

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[ How Trump’s budget moves us backwards on public lands energy ]

Earlier this week the Trump administration released its detailed budget for the federal government.

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