[1THING] Blog

Arctic drilling acreage reveals the oil sector overreach

Tim Woody

Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s bill to authorize oil drilling in the Arctic Refuge has advanced out of committee and is poised to be attached to the Republican tax package. It will then go before the full Senate for a filibuster-proof vote requiring only a simple 51-vote majority to pass.

Why Honeycutt is such an alarming choice for EPA’s science advisory panel

Beyond his inexperience, Honeycutt's faulty logic could have a direct effect on science at the EPA.

     

Outdoor companies and non-profits petition feds to ban public land sell-offs

A range of companies and organizations including The Wilderness Society, American Alpine Club and First Lite Clothing have submitted a legal petition via the Administrative Procedures Act that would direct Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to develop rules prohibiting the sale or transfer of public lands.

Outdoor Interests Ask Secretary Zinke to ‘Walk the Talk’ on Public Lands

Kate Mackay

Today a national coalition of sportsmen, recreation, business and conservation groups calls on the Department of the Interior and Secretary Ryan Zinke to make good on its promise to the American public that it is against the widespread sale or transfer of 445 million acres of public lands under

Three Easy Actions to Take for a Greener Office on America Recycles Day

Today is the 10th annual America Recycles Day a nationally recognized day and an initiative by Keep America Beautiful that promotes ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle in our everyday lives. America Recycles Day is dedicated to the individual actions that people can take that create a collective difference for our environment! Having normal “blue bin” style recycling in the office is an awesome start, but let’s take a look at some other ways to boost your recycling program (if you don’t have a recycling program in place, check out our previous blog post that can help you get one started). Here are three easy ways you can enhance your workplace recycling in celebration of America Recycles Day.

Deal with the Graveyard of Dead Electronics: Recycle Electronics

Electronics are all around us, especially in a workplace. So what happens to all of those electronics when they kick the bucket? Electronic waste, also known as e-waste, should be properly recycled with a certified e-waste recycling company. Printers, computers, laptops, fax machines, phones (yes, most offices have landlines) can all be taken to a recycling location or a temporary collection event. Some businesses even offer to pick these items up from your workplace. Start by designating a spot in your workplace to collect electronics that are no longer working and can no longer be repaired (you can search for repair options on WasteFreeSD.org ). When you want to recycle the collected e-waste, simply use the search bar on WasteFreeSD.org by typing in a specific item, “E-waste Collection Event”, or “Electronic Waste Pick-up”.

Make sure everyone in the office knows where to drop off any electronic waste to be recycled.

Donate Before Ditching: Give Unwanted Office Supplies and Furniture to a Thrift Store

Does your workplace have way too many paper trays or stockpiles of old binders? Did your office go through a remodel and now has a bunch of outdated office decor? Don’t toss these items! Give your supplies and furniture a shot at finding a new home by donating them to a thrift store. Start by letting your colleagues know about the collection of unwanted office supplies, where they should drop off their unwanted supplies, and give them the opportunity to grab something they might need from the collection before it’s donated. Head over to WasteFreeSD.org to search “Thrift Stores” if you don’t know your nearest one. You can even find a local thrift store or organization that specializes in just second-hand furniture if you recently upgraded your office furniture.

Recent workplace renovations? Donate your unwanted office furniture or supplies to a nearby thrift store!

Stop Wasting Half the Paper Supply: Print Double-sided

A staple in almost any office is a large industrial printer. And chances are your office goes through a ton of paper. Remember to recycle that paper first off! Ensure that each cubicle, office, and room has a recycling bin and clear signage indicating the types of items that should be placed in it. But there is also another option to cut down on wasted paper: printing double-sided. Change your printer’s default setting to printing on both sides to reduce the amount of paper used. Another option is to have a pile of “previously printed on paper” that has an unused side. Utilize paper from this pile to manually feed into your printer for one-sided print jobs or for scratch paper!

Set those printer default settings to print on both sides of the paper!

Keep Up the Recycling Momentum

Don’t let your recycling efforts fade after America Recycles Day ends. Keep the conversation going! Each workplace should have a designated recycling champion…that can be you! Kindly remind your co-workers about recycling guidelines, reward anyone you catch “green-handed” (recycling correctly or contributing to the donation pile), and celebrate your workplace achievements with all of the staff. Don’t wait until the next America Recycles Day to implement a new practice and remember to provide your team with resources that make recycling crystal clear.

For more information regarding recycling, visit the Resources Page at WasteFreeSD.org or register for an upcoming workshop.

4 smart investments helped these communities weather extreme storms

Some of these concrete and often-easy projects pay for themselves in just a few years.

     

Senators vote for Arctic Refuge drilling based on inflated numbers

Tim Woody

The U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee today approved a bill that would allow oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Media advisory for Nov 16: Diverse outdoor groups ask Secretary Zinke to “walk the talk” on public lands

Michael Reinemer

Telephone Press Conference Thursday, November 16, 2017 – 1 pm ET, 11 am MT, 10 am PT

Keywords: 

Your City Can Go Straw-Free Like Seattle

Your City Can Go Straw-Free Like Seattle

Straws

Max Pixel


Straws are one of the most common items found during beach cleanups. It’s not hard to understand why: Americans use over 500 million straws every day. And a large portion of those straws end up floating in the ocean’s giant garbage patches, or eaten by animals. An estimated 71% of seabirds and 30% of turtles have been found with plastics in their stomachs.

When it comes to plastic pollution, straws are low-hanging fruit: they’re usually offered by restaurants out of habit more than need. All we need is a cultural shift to reduce straw use and luckily, we’re already making progress.

In September, Seattle became the first major city to ban plastic straws. By next summer, the city won’t allow restaurants and other businesses to offer plastic straws to patrons. Many are already making the switch. The move in Seattle alone is expected to save as many as one million straws per month.

Banning plastic straws is a great idea for cities that have already seen much success banning and taxing plastic bags.

Seattle was supported in its new law by the environmental group Lonely Whale Foundation. Building on Seattle's example, Lonely Whale now wants to ban straws in other cities through its #StopSucking campaign.

Do you want to bring #StopSucking to your city? There are several ways to get involved.

First, place your vote for the next cities you want to see ban plastic straws.

Second, accept and challenge someone else to #stopsucking through social media. Visit Lonely Whale to learn how.

Third, get your favorite bar, restaurant, or coffee shop to #stopsucking by sending them this toolkit for managers.

At the very least, get in the habit of telling your server “No plastic straw, please!” before you order a beverage, And be ready to tell them why.

 

Learn more:

Rise Above Plastics, Surfrider Foundation
Seattle Stopped Sucking—So Can You, Sierra Club 
Cities Winning Against Plastic Bag Pollution, EarthShare

5 reasons Election Day 2017 was a win for climate action

A year after Donald Trump won the presidency, the electoral backlash has arrived – and it’s good news for the environment.