[1THING] Blog

[ Trump is using every tool to sellout our public lands to coal, oil and gas companies ]

On Thursday, March 23, it asked a court to stop a rule designed to ensure taxpayers get a fair return from oil, gas and coal sold from mines and wells on public lands by asking for a “stay.”  The “Valuation Rule” was designed to prevent coal companies from pocketing

Keywords: 

[ Zero Waste Festival Guide ]

Today’s blog was written by Senior Director of Operations, Natalie!

With music festival season coming up, thousands will be flocking to Indo for Coachella and Stagecoach as well as many other festivals around the country. Navigating how to be as eco-friendly as possible while enjoying these festivals can be tricky. Often, it takes just a few steps to plan ahead so you can reduce your waste, protect the environment, and save a little money too. Here are a few tips to plan for a sustainable festival season.

Getting There
Carpool! We took an RV to Stagecoach in Indio last year. We all met up in San Diego to ride together rather than meet up at the festival in separate cars. This saved a lot of money from parking fees and logistical headaches at the festival as well. Look for carpool incentives at upcoming festivals.

Enjoying the Festival
In the desert during long festival days, it’s important to stay hydrated. Buying individual water bottles was not only wasteful for the environment, it also meant waiting in long lines to keep buying water and spending a lot on marked up bottle prices. We planned ahead and brought hydration backpacks that we could refill at the water refill stations around the festival grounds. Reusable water bottles would work very well too. This not only saved on what would have been numerous single-use plastic bottles, but also saved us a lot of money and fewer water trips, which meant more time spent enjoying the concert!

camelbak backpack

Plan ahead if you’re camping. Unfortunately, there was a rule about no glass on the campgrounds for Stagecoach when I went. Plan ahead with reusable plastic or aluminum glassware, as well as reusable utensils and plates. We found that all-in-one utensils worked really well to avoid having to wash as many utensils while camping. Reusable cloth napkins are a great option for napkins—it was fun giving everyone brightly colored tea towels so they could remember which one was theirs. We planned most of our meals to avoid needing utensils or plates all together to make cleanup easy and waste-free. For food, we brought fruits and veggies that we pre-sliced at home, opted for handheld foods like hotdogs and sandwiches, and utilized items with very minimal packaging. It was tempting to bring a bunch of prepackaged meals like microwaveable individually wrapped breakfast sandwiches and mini chip bags, but instead choose homemade guacamole in a Tupperware, homemade muffins, bulk snack foods in reusable bags, and other more eco-friendly choices.

reusable napkin options

More Tips

  • Composting: I brought a small bin with a tight sealing lid to house our food scraps to take home with us to compost. I was so excited to find compost bins around the festival for food scraps while inside!
  • For beverages around the campsite, we brought as much as we could in bulk to avoid excess packaging from single serving beverages. Beer in stainless steel growlers were great to have on hand so we could enjoy our favorite craft beers while abiding by the no glass rule. When we needed to, we opted for beer in cans since they could get recycled.
  • Set up your campsite to make it easy on those with less knowledge of recycling and composting. As the trip organizer, I set up bags for trash, a bin for food scraps, and a bag for recycling, and I gave everyone some quick reminders based on the food we had so it was easier to remember. I also double-checked the bags before we closed them up to make sure items were correctly placed.

More sustainable and zero waste tips on festival websites:

[ Why rust belt states are tackling methane when Trump won’t ]

A growing number of states that supported Trump in 2016 are taking steps to rein in methane leaks from the oil and gas industry. It’s easy to see why.

     

[ In another sneak attack, Senate votes to undermine Alaska refuges. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge next? ]

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is America’s last big, pristine and wild place, and it is facing challenges greater than at any time in more than a decade. When the time comes to decide its future, we must be sure lawmakers don’t repeat the mistake they made this week.

[ New report shows State of New Mexico has history of restricting public access and selling-off state trust lands ]

Jennifer Dickson

The state of New Mexico has sold 4 million acres of state trust lands to private interests and extractive industries, some of which endanger the health, environment, and economy of local communities, according to

[ Study identifies strategies for preserving and connecting vulnerable habitat to preserve wild, connected and diverse protected lands ]

Michael Reinemer

The most recent paper, “Wild, connected, and diverse: building a more resilient system of protected areas,” will be published in Ecological Applications, a journal of the Ecologic

[ Response to Trump Budget: Wilderness Society Decries Decline in Care for America’s Public Lands ]

Michael Reinemer

“It’s fitting for President Trump to release his budget in March, because this is simply madness,” said Cam Witten, Government Relations and Budget Specialist at The Wilderness Society.

[ Alaska gas pipeline leak highlights hazards of Arctic Ocean drilling ]

In a preview of what could happen with offshore drilling in the Arctic Ocean, an underwater natural gas pipeline has been leaking in Alaska since December, and no repair is expected until late April, at the earliest.

Keywords: 

[ Trump administration’s “skinny budget” would starve parks and conservation programs ]

As part of a historically low domestic spending proposal, President Trump wants to cut funding for the Department of the Interior by about 12 percent, selling out public lands and severely undermining the booming outdoor recreation economy. Additionally, Trump’s budget would slash the Environmental Protection Agency budget by 31 percent, eliminating thousands of jobs from that agency.

[ The Wilderness Society encouraged by climate resolution from 17 House Republicans ]

Anastasia Greene

Yesterday, 17 Republican Members of the House