[1THING] Blog: Posts Tagged ‘beaches’

[ 5 Outdoor Activities for the Eco-friendly Adventurer ]

We found this great article at the I Love a Clean San Diego website. It’s got some really super ourdoor ideas that are eco friendly and with Summer coming…this is perfect timing.SDoutdoor (300x222)

A Southern California summer is not made for staying inside. The sun’s too bright, the sky’s too blue, and it’s important for you to get outside and enjoy time with your family and friends. Many of the I Love A Clean San Diego staff have already taken time to enjoy our gorgeous scenery properly. From all of our outdoor experiences, we decided to share a list of environmentally sound activities we love to help get you outside this beautiful time of year.

Tide-pooling
We get to live here in California, one of the few places in the world that has tide pools and they are a must when it comes to experiencing San Diego. Grab a friend and head out to Cabrillo National Marine Sanctuary, Sunset Cliffs, or La Jolla Shores. Explore all the critters in tide pools. Make sure to tread lightly, because you are walking on their homes.

Surfing
We live in Southern California, which is known internationally for surfing opportunities. The more you surf, the more you get a first-hand experience of interacting with the ocean and all of the creatures there.

There’s also hiking, surfing and stand-up paddleboarding.  For the full article, check out this page at ‘I Love a Clean San Diego.’

[ ReWild Unveils Restoration Options for Mission Bay ]

Mission Bay, San Diego

Mission Bay, San Diego

SAN DIEGO, September 28, 2016 — Last night, ReWild Mission Bay – a project of San Diego Audubon and its partners to enhance and restore up to 170 acres of wetlands in the North East corner of Mission Bay – unveiled eight possible options for restoration. Based on community suggestions from two public workshops earlier this year, the draft plans were presented to more than 135 community members to collect input. To view the potential alternatives, please click here.

“Our community has been very vocal about its support for restoring and protecting this iconic part of San Diego that so many people love and cherish,” said Rebecca Schwartz Lesberg, project manager for ReWild Mission Bay. “These eight designs reflect what the community has asked for and identified as important to keep Mission Bay healthy and enjoyable for all uses and for generations to come.”

The September 27 public workshop was the third in a series of four. ReWild Mission Bay will work with scientists and engineers to determine the feasibility of the eight initial restoration alternatives. Refined versions of the alternatives presented on Tuesday, or combinations of features from several different alternatives, may move forward to become final restoration designs. Residents can expect one more public workshop in late 2016 or early 2017 to weigh in on these designs before they are finalized.

“This is an unprecedented opportunity to protect our communities from sea level rise, expand habitat for endangered birds, help our kids get out in nature, and provide cleaner water for all San Diegans to enjoy in Mission Bay,” said Schwartz.

Through ReWild Mission Bay, San Diego Audubon is facilitating a three-year planning process that includes collecting community input and conceptualizing plans to restore the wetlands along Pacific Beach Drive and on both sides of Rose Creek. By May of 2017, this process will have produced at least three versions of a community-informed, scientifically defensible wetlands restoration plan for the North East corner of Mission Bay. San Diego Audubon is working closely with the City of San Diego, the California State Coastal Conservancy, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, and the University of California’s Natural Reserve System on the effort. Next steps include final approval, environmental review and permitting before the restoration of the area’s wetlands.

Wetlands — including marshes, mud flats, riverbanks and more — play an important role in San Diego’s quality of life, as they attract wildlife, foster a diverse ecosystem, improve water quality and protect communities from flooding by providing a cushion during high tides. Today, only five percent of the historic 4,000 acres of Mission Bay wetlands remain, making ReWild Mission Bay a critical and time-sensitive project for the area.

For more information on ReWild Mission Bay and the project timeline, please visit http://www.rewildmissionbay.org.

[ San Diego Teachers Turn Local Pollution Into Curriculum at Coastkeeper Training ]

SDBeach-dreamstime_s_6663953On September 16, the teachers will become the students for a day when San Diego Coastkeeper and the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center team up to train K-12 teachers to inspire students to protect San Diego’s waters. Teachers from all over San Diego County are invited to get the tools they need to help kids grow into expert water protectors, such as hands-on lesson plans based on San Diego’s water issues.

“Water quality and quantity are some of the biggest issues facing humanity today, especially in drought-stricken California,” says Sandra Lebrón, education manager at Coastkeeper. “With our water-science curriculum, teachers can prepare the next generation of leaders to find solutions to these problems.”

The professional development training will demonstrate environmental lessons that teachers can use to help their students learn about San Diego’s waters, take action to minimize and monitor pollution and understand the connections between living things and one of our most vital resources — water.

“We want to show teachers how to use real-world problems happening right here in San Diego – like trash ending up on our beaches – to help students deepen their knowledge of environmental issues and sharpen their problem-solving skills,” says Lebrón.

All lessons in the training incorporate Next Generation Science Standards and include hands-on lessons to be taught in classrooms or informal settings, including after school programs.

The professional development training is on Friday, September 16 from 4 – 6 p.m. and is open to all K-12 teachers with an entry fee of $16. To learn more and register visit: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2591764

For more information on San Diego Coastkeeper’s Water Education Programs visit:

www.sdcoastkeeper.org/learn/drinkable/water-education-for-all

or

www.sdcoastkeeper.org/learn/drinkable/project-swell