[1THING] Blog: Posts Tagged ‘climate change’

[ 1THING Featured for October: Surfrider Foundation ]

Surfrider-Foundation_Logo-200pxThe Surfrider Foundation is dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the world’s ocean, waves and beaches through a powerful activist network.

Our ocean faces growing challenges from pollution, offshore development and climate change. At the same time, expanding industries, such as offshore oil drilling, threaten to crowd our ocean and degrade its health (and those who call it home!).

Every day poses new threats to our oceans and beaches. Our ocean and special places must be proactively protected before they are threatened and stem the tide before further damage is done to the ocean’s health.

This is precisely why Surfrider has built a network of passion-driven people who are on the ground and are the voice for our ocean and beaches. With one foot in the sand and the other in the water, Surfrider is the only non-profit organization who is 100% focused on our coasts.

Visit Surfrider.org to find out more and to donate now!

[ A Sustainable Solution To Water Supply Challenges ]

Because San Diego lacks a local drinking water source, we import 85% of our water from the Colorado River and Northern California Bay Delta. Due to that and droughts, San Diego falls victim to rising water costs from dreamstime_s_40503571wholesalers. The cost of water has tripled over the last 15 years and does not show signs of dropping. In fact it is currently getting even higher. What do we do? We obviously need water to live.

The city of San Diego has launched Pure Water San Diego. This is a program to help manage our own existing water supply and uses advanced water purification technologies to recycle wastewater into safe, high-quality drinking water. In essence it’s basically recycling our own water…how brilliant is that? Although this is a remarkable step forward in water preservation, reaching the goal of producing approximately one-third of San Diego’s water supply by 2035 isn’t a cheap endeavor. The bill for just the first phase is a healthy $1.2 billion.

To read the rest of this article from Brookings…CLICK HERE. 

[ 5 things you can do about climate change ]

It may not seem like your helping on a global scale, but things that you can do at home to help prevent climate change really do make a big difference. Things like replacing that old thermosta for heating and cooling with adreamstime_s_68175341 (2) programmable thermostat allows you to turn off the heating or A/C when you’re not home. For $20 you can’t go wrong. Your Helping the enviromemt and shaving hundreds off your energy bill.

Replacing your toilet with a new one is a great way to manage water usage. A lot of people don’t realize how much water each flush takes. The EPA says toilets account for nearly 30% of the average home’s indoor water use.

Also be greener at the office. There is no need to abandon your hard work saving the environment when you leave your home. Power down that computer, recycle those soda cans and water bottles. Most offices these days should have recycling programs. If your office does not, be proative…initiate one!

To read the full list of helpful things you can do. Read this article from CNN by clicking HERE! 

[ 8 Ways to Reduce Your Ecological Footprint ]

I love a Clean San Diego never fails to have interesting, informative articles on how we can all make a difference. We recently found this article on their website. dreamstime_xl_7685218 (2) (600x600)

Ecological footprint: the impact of a person or community on the environment, expressed as the amount of land required to sustain their use of natural resources

It’s been estimated that it would take 3.9 Earths to sustain the world population if everyone lived like we do in the US. When considering factors like food, water-use, waste and transportation, it’s clear there’s an urgent need for more sustainable daily actions. Luckily, you can start creating these habits today!

Check out the Global Footprint Calculator from the Global Footprint Network to understand your ecological footprint. Then, incorporate these suggestions to reduce your ecological footprint and make a positive impact!

  1. Reduce Your Use of Single-Use, Disposable Plastics. Did you know all the plastic we’ve ever made still exists? We use disposable plastic shopping bags for an average of 12 minutes before we discard them (and yes, there are still plastic shopping bags at clothing stores, hardware stores, and more). Other single-use plastics like straws, cups, and utensils aren’t used for much longer. Make the switch to reusable items, such as reusable water bottle, reusable shopping bag, and reusable cups.
  2. Switch to Renewable Energy. According to the EPA, the electricity sector was the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the US in 2014. If you have the budget and living situation to switch to solar, look into installation options. If you don’t, there are still many ways to reduce your use of nonrenewable energy. Look into renewable energy options through programs like SDG&E’s EcoChoice. The program allows you to switch 50-100% of your energy bill to renewable energy from clean sources. Best of all: it’s easy and affordable! Log in to your account for an estimate and reduce your ecological footprint in a click.

To Read this terrific article…CLICK HERE! 

[ Featured For April: Friends of the Earth ]

Friends-o-the-Earth591x218Friends of the Earth is an international environmental protection organization that “strives for a more healthy and just world”. Their work pushes for reforms politically on a large scale as well as smaller community networks focused on the preservation of shared Earth resources.

“We understand that the challenges facing our planet call for more than half measures, so we push for the reforms that are needed, not merely the ones that are politically easy.” – FOE

Together they have 75 national member groups collaborating for the international conservation effort, representing more than two million activist in more than 60 countries. In the United States, FOE works with Congressmen, state authorities and community groups in all 50 states to urge policymakers and community leaders to “work towards a healthy envirornment for all people.”

Throughout their 47-year history, Friends of the Earth has been working “to change the perception of the public, media and policy makers” and institute global environmental protection efforts. Their main efforts go specifically to curbing the environmental degradationon drivers like public investment, granting corporations the right to pollute, or other factors on federal and state levels.

What Makes FOE Different:
– They fight for what’s needed over the longer term for all creatures on our planet, not for what is easy or popular in the short term
– They are a loud and fearless voice for the environment and have been for 47 years
– They act globally and locally, with a worldwide networks of activist in 75 countries (and counting)
– They know that solving deep-rooted environmental problems requires exposing and fighting the economic forces that fuel them
– They employ a variety of tactics such as policy analysis, grassroots activism, litigation and creative communication to win their campaigns fairly.

What FOE Has Achieved:
– Limits the Air pollution from Ships
– Persuaded Thousands of Grocery Stores to Commit to Not Selling Genetically Engineered Salmon
– Stopped Construction of Dangerous Nuclear Reactors
– Exposed Corruption in the Review of the Keystone XL tar sands oil Pipeline.

On an international level they have collaborated to bring projects like the Climate Justice and Energy Program giving communities the right to choose thier own sustainable energy sources, and working with the UN negotiators to agree on climate finance and ending deforestation.

They also have started a Food Sovereignty program aimed to halt genetically modified organisms from human consumption. FOE is also responsible for the Forest and Biodiversity program that campaigns against illegal logging and deforestation and works with communities to manage their forest as well as opposing and exposing the negative impacts of monoculture plantations of cromps like sugar cane, palm oil and soy.

In a statement on their website FOE describes their battles to protect the environment as, “Hard work. But the pressures facing our planet and it’s people are too important for us to compromise.”

Find out more about ‘Friends of the Earth’ here.

[ The Global Environment Facility ]

The Global Environment Facility

We frequently say going green will only work when it helps save the “green” – as in cash. The GEF is uniquely positioned in that space where financial investments are made to help the environment.

TheGef_591x218About The GEF

The Global Environment Facility (GEF), is a catalyst for action on the environment. Through its strategic investments, the GEF works with partners to tackle the planet’s biggest environmental issues.

• A UNIQUE PARTNERSHIP of 18 agencies — including United Nations agencies, multilateral development banks, national entities and international NGOs — working with 183 countries to address the world’s most challenging environmental issues. The GEF has a large network of civil society organizations, works closely with the private sector around the world, and receives continuous inputs from an independent evaluation office and a world-class scientific panel.
• A FINANCIAL MECHANISM for 5 major international environmental conventions: the Minamata Convention on Mercury, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (UNCBD), the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
• AN INNOVATOR AND CATALYST that supports multi-stakeholder alliances to preserve threatened ecosystems on land and in the oceans, build greener cities, boost food security and promote clean energy for a more prosperous, climate-resilient world; leveraging $5.2 in additional financing for every $1 invested.


Achievements

Over the past 25 years, the GEF has supported a range of notable achievements:

• Creation of more than 3,300 protected areas covering 860 million hectares, an area larger than Brazil.
• Conservation-friendly management of more than 352 million hectares of productive landscapes and seascapes
• 790 climate change mitigation projects contributing to 2.7 billion tons of GHG emission reductions.
• Sustainable management of 34 transboundary river basins in 73 countries.
• Improved cooperation and governance of one-third of the world’s large marine ecosystems.
• Sound management and disposal of 200,000 tons of highly toxic Persistent Organic Pollutants.
• Climate change adaptation to reduce the vulnerability of more than 15 million people in 130 countries.

The Future

• Environmental threats are growing on a global scale. Although the GEF has had a huge impact in addressing these threats, it recognizes the need for a more comprehensive vision.

• The 2020 Strategy positions the GEF as a champion of the global environment. It sets out a blueprint for tackling the root causes of environmental degradation through core projects and innovative pilots, while delivering cost-effective, high-impact results. To do all this, the GEF will mobilize local and global stakeholders — from national and local governments to the private sector to civil society, including indigenous peoples and research institutions.

Get more information at https://www.thegef.org

[ Stand For Trees ]

LoveATree-400pxStand For Trees is an innovative grassroots campaign that enables individuals – all of us – to take real action to stop forest loss: the number one cause of species extinction and second-leading cause of CO2 emissions globally.

Although we know stopping deforestation is critical to curbing climate change, we continue to lose a forest the size of New York City every 48 hours. And deforestation and forest degradation are now larger contributors to climate change than every plane, train, car, and ship on the planet combined.

Fortunately, we have the solution. Since 2007, the international community has been working together on the REDD+ program to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. Now, for the first time, the Stand For Trees model allows individuals to be part of this solution by harnessing the power of technology and social media so we can all support local communities who are implementing REDD+ practices on the ground in tropical forest countries.

When you Stand For Trees, you stand for investing in communities who are pursuing new economic opportunities — creating the economy of tomorrow where trees are more valuable standing than cut down.

Learn how you can help by visiting https://standfortrees.org