[1THING] Blog: Posts Tagged ‘conservation’

[ Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation ]

In 2015, San Diego WON the Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge and we’d like to retake our crown! The contest this year starts on April 1 and ends April 30, encouraging San Diego residents to sign up in order to save or conserve water. To sign up and read more about this, go to Wylandfoundation.org.

Residents from more than 4,800 cities across the United States took part in the 2017 Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation, April 1-30, by pledging todreamstime_s_62758794 save over 2.2 billion gallons of water over the next year. The annual month-long campaign to promote drought resiliency and water quality ended on April 30 with mayors from 38 states vying to see whose city could be the nation’s most “water wise.”

The cities with the highest percentage of residents making pledges during the campaign , including our very own San Diego, CA are Laguna Beach, Calif., Flagstaff, Ariz., Athens, Ga, Aurora, Colo., and Dallas, Texas. Overall, residents around the nation, from Anchorage to the Florida Keys, made 421,891 pledges to change behaviors ranging from fixing home leaks to reducing harmful runoff into local rivers and streams.

The challenge, presented by the Wyland Foundation and Toyota, with support from the U.S EPA, National League of Cities, The Toro Company, Earth Friendly Products – maker of ECOS, and Conserva Irrigation, addresses the growing importance of educating consumers about the many ways they use water.

“This year’s challenge took a hard look at things we can all do to reduce our impact on our lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands,” said marine life artist Wyland, who founded the Wyland Foundation in 1993. “The more we can do to reduce harmful runoff into our water systems, the more we can provide long-term sustainable benefits to our communities.”

 

 

[ Permanent Water Use Restrictions in San Diego ]

The lack of water in San Diego is no joke. Sure we have warm beach weather, but the reality of San Diego drying up isdreamstime_s_69230872 far too real.  It’s always a good idea to refresh yourself with way you can conserve our much needed water.

The city of San Diego website has very specific water conservation guidelines.

  • Customers shall not wash down sidewalks, driveways, parking areas, tennis courts, or other paved areas without using a power washer or a hose with a shutoff nozzle.  Washing any paved areas is only allowed to alleviate immediate safety or sanitation hazards.  Water shall be collected and prevented from leaving the property and entering the municipal separate storm sewer system.
  • Customers shall not overfill swimming pools and spas.
  • Customers shall not use non-recirculating potable water in ornamental fountains or cascading fountains.
  • Customers shall not use a hose that dispenses potable water to wash a motor vehicle, except where the hose is fitted with a shut-off nozzle or device attached to it that causes it to cease dispensing water immediately when not in use.

Visit the City of San Diego website for more ways you can save our precious water.

 

[ Christmas Tree Recycling in San Diego ]

ChristmasTreeRecycleFrom the City of San Diego web site, here is information on Christmas Tree recycling..

 

Where can I recycle a Christmas tree?

  • The Miramar Greenery accepts trees throughout the year.
  • I Love a Clean San Diego and the County of San Diego have a website at www.WasteFreeSD.org to help County residents find the nearest tree recycling dropoff site in San Diego County.
  • Curbside collection (For residents with yard waste collection only)
    • Manual container customers using their own bins should place trees on the curb for collection on your regular greenery recycling pickup day. Trees over four feet in length should be cut in half.
    • Automated container customers using the large, green 96-gallon bin provided by the city should cut their trees to fit into the automated container for pickup on collection day.

Drop-off Locations

  • Carmel Valley – Carmel Valley Recreation Center, 3777 Townsgate Drive, lower parking lot
  • Encanto – Cielo Drive at Woodman Street
  • Golden Hill – Golden Hill Recreation Center, 2600 Golf Course Drive
  • La Jolla – Kate Sessions Memorial Park, Soledad Road and Loring Street
  • Logan Heights – Memorial Recreation Center, 2902 Marcy Avenue
  • Miramar – The Greenery at the Miramar Landfill, Convoy Street north of Highway 52
  • Mission Bay – Sea World Drive at Pacific Highway
  • Oak Park – Chollas Lake, 6350 College Grove Drive, in Gloria’s Mesa parking lot
  • Ocean Beach – Robb Athletic Field Recreation Center, 2525 Bacon Street
  • Otay Mesa/Nestor – Montgomery Waller Community Park (lower-west parking lot)
  • Rancho Bernardo – Rancho Bernardo Recreation Center, 18448 W. Bernardo Drive
  • Rancho Penasquitos – Canyonside Recreation Center, 12350 Black Mountain Road
  • San Diego State University – Parking Lot 17C off Alvarado Road
  • Scripps Ranch – Scripps Ranch Recreation Center, 11454 Blue Cypress Drive
  • Tierrasanta – De Portola Middle School, 11010 Clairemont Mesa Boulevard
  • University City – Swanson Pool, 3585 Governor Drive

[ 1THING Featured for November: Earthjustice ]

EarthJustice_BANNERTrue and lasting change happens when the power of the law is on your side. That’s why the earth needs a good lawyer.

Today’s environmental challenges are greater than ever. But we live in a country of strong environmental laws—and Earthjustice holds those who break our nation’s laws accountable for their actions.

We’ve been the legal backbone for more than a thousand organizations across the country, large and small. And we represent every one of our clients free of charge.

Behind nearly every major environmental court battle—from protecting gray wolves from slaughter to representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in their fight against the Dakota Access pipeline- you’ll find an Earthjustice attorney.

As the nation’s largest nonprofit environmental law organization, we’re committed to the vision of a just and sustainable future. Join us.

www.earthjustice.org

 

[ 1THING Featured for October: Surfrider Foundation ]

Surfrider-Foundation_Logo-200pxThe Surfrider Foundation is dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the world’s ocean, waves and beaches through a powerful activist network.

Our ocean faces growing challenges from pollution, offshore development and climate change. At the same time, expanding industries, such as offshore oil drilling, threaten to crowd our ocean and degrade its health (and those who call it home!).

Every day poses new threats to our oceans and beaches. Our ocean and special places must be proactively protected before they are threatened and stem the tide before further damage is done to the ocean’s health.

This is precisely why Surfrider has built a network of passion-driven people who are on the ground and are the voice for our ocean and beaches. With one foot in the sand and the other in the water, Surfrider is the only non-profit organization who is 100% focused on our coasts.

Visit Surfrider.org to find out more and to donate now!

[ Help Save Endangered Sea Turtles ]

dreamstime_s_17043206Extinction is not a new concept.

In fact, species have been going extinct for millions of years from geological and climate changes. The issue now is from overconsumption, pollution, and habitat destruction brought on by humans causing more species to needlessly become extinct.

So why should we care about sea turtles extinction in particular?

For starters, sea turtles help maintain the health of sea grass by eating it. Healthy sea grass allows other oceanic species such as crustaceans, fish, and shellfish to be able to breed. This would impact a huge source of food for humans.

In addition, when sea turtles lay eggs in dunes, the shells and unhatched eggs left behind provide nutrients that facilitate vegetation growth. This strengthens the beach’s ecosystem as a whole and helps prevent erosion.

So help save sea turtles around the world by donating or purchasing some adorable sea turtle pillows here:

http://costaricaturtles.com/how-to-help/

Donation not enough for you? You can always become an alliance partner!

For more information, visit: http://costaricaturtles.com/

[ What is Fairtrade? ]

If you are anything like me, l had heard the phrase Fairtrade, but didn’t really know what it meant. I knew it had something to do with helping the environment but that was about the extent of my knowledge. Fair trade isdreamstime_s_85080660 (2) a far overlooked concept that if practiced, could make a huge difference in the world we live in.

When purchasing fairtrade coffee for instance, it can mean five times the pay for a farmer vs. child labor. Through Fairtrade, farmers and workers take control and build sustainable futures for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Fairtrade America states…”The difference between “Fairtrade” and “fair trade” is that “Fairtrade” refers only to Fairtrade organizations (such as Fairtrade America) or products certified through the Fairtrade International system. Conversely, “fair trade” can refer to many different things – the fair trade movement, fair trade products generally, products that claim to be fairly traded but do not carry the FAIRTRADE Mark.”

To read a very informative and interesting article from Fairtrade America….CLICK HERE!

[ San Diego Coastkeeper Releases 2016 Water Quality Report ]

WaterQuality-dreamstimeSAN DIEGO, August 1, 2017— This week, San Diego Coastkeeper, an organization protecting and restoring San Diego County’s fishable, swimmable, drinkable water, published its 2016 San Diego County Water Quality Report. The organization’s data show an overall improvement in San Diego’s water quality for the first time since 2013.

“This is great news. Of course, a single year of overall better water quality readings does not mean San Diego’s water will keep improving. It takes many years for patterns to emerge,” says San Diego Coastkeeper Lab Manager Meredith Meyers. “That’s why our long-term water monitoring is so crucial. We can provide decision-makers with the big picture and that makes for more effective, data-based policy.”

Urban runoff continues to be the largest factor impacting people’s ability to safely fish and swim in San Diego County. Rain takes pollution from the surfaces of our streets into our storm drains, where it travels through to our rivers and streams and ultimately, to the Pacific Ocean. As a result, the overwhelming majority of San Diego’s waterways fail to the meet water quality standards that make them safe for recreation.

Though the cause of last year’s improved results can’t be directly identified, and Coastkeeper scientists caution against giving too much credit to any one theory, there are a few ideas about why water quality looked a little better in 2016.

“Temporary water conservation regulations, implemented in response to the drought, may have helped water quality improve. When San Diegans prioritize conservation over lush lawns, reduced fertilizer use and fewer lawn sprinklers overflowing onto sidewalks means less pollution washing from the street into our rivers and streams,” says Meyers. “It’s impossible to know for sure, but it’s one idea that makes sense.”

San Diego Coastkeeper collects monthly water quality data from across the County through its volunteer-powered Water Quality Monitoring program. The program, which is the largest of its kind in California, trains citizen scientists to collect vital water quality data to fill gaps and increase the amount of publically available data.. In 2016, 152 trained volunteers gave a collective 1,908 hours.

“Our Water Quality Monitors are more dedicated than ever. Participation was so consistent last year we were able to reduce the number of new volunteers we needed to bring on board to maintain the program,” says Meyers. “The dedication of our trained monitors has allowed us to put even more resources straight into the monitoring itself, and has improved the program as a whole.”

The organization uses a suite of indicators to calculate an overall 2016 Water Quality Score for different watersheds across San Diego County. For the first time since 2013, some of San Diego County’s watersheds surpassed the “Fair” rating on the Water Quality Index,” reaching “Good.” Each watershed below is linked to more details about the watershed’s 2016 water quality:

  • San Luis Rey                      82     Good
  • Buena Vista                        78     Fair
  • San Marcos (Batiquitos)      79     Fair
  • Escondido Creek                 72     Fair
  • Peñasquitos                       76     Fair
  • Rose Creek                           87     Good
  • San Dieguito                       78     Fair
  • San Diego                          72     Fair
  • Pueblo                                56     Marginal
  • Sweetwater                         74     Fair (20 percent improvement from 2015)
  • Otay                                70     Fair
  • Tijuana                                   N/A   (unsafe to test because of sewage contamination)

“Every year, our results continue to show that water quality is defined by all of us. There’s no single source of pollution poisoning our environment; it’s all of our daily actions that determine our water quality,” says Meyers. “Whenever you pick up a piece of litter, fix a leaky sprinkler or forgo chemical fertilizers in your garden, you make a real impact. We all have the opportunity to take small actions that matter.”

After each month’s water sampling, San Diego Coastkeeper updates its online, color-coded water quality map. See June 2017’s water quality results.

Read the full water quality report for 2016 here.

As a trained Water Quality Monitor, volunteers can learn how to generate vital, scientifically sound data to better inform decision-makers and the public. Visit San Diego Coastkeeper’s website to learn more, sign up for training, to view the 2017 water quality-monitoring schedule and to donate to help the organization continue doing this important work.

 

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San Diego Coastkeeper

Founded in 1995, San Diego Coastkeeper protects and restores fishable, swimmable and drinkable waters in San Diego County. For more information, visit San Diego Coastkeeper online at http://www.sdcoastkeeper.org.

 

[ The National Park Foundation ]

“Our national parks are a uniquely American idea, truly supported by all of us. We are inspired by the beauty that surrounds us. We seek the wild and untamed land, the places where history was made, the sites that honor our heroes, and we stand behind what really matters – protecting these sacred places.”

NationalParkFoundation

The National Park Foundation, the official charitable partner of the National Park Service, enriches America’s national parks and programs through the support of private citizens, park lovers, stewards of nature, history enthusiasts and wilderness adventurers.

Chartered by Congress in 1967, the Foundation grew out of a legacy of park protection that began over a century ago when ordinary citizens took action to establish and protect our national parks.

Today, the National Park Foundation carries on the tradition of early park advocates, big thinkers, doers and dreamers. It works to keep trails clear, partners with collaborators such as the White House to get kids outdoors, and most importantly, raises and allocates critical funds to keep our national parks safe.

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul alike.”

John Muir, early advocate for the preservation of wilderness in the U.S.

To learn more and support our parks, visit https://www.nationalparks.org/

 

[ No yard, no problem! Composting in small spaces. ]

Many of you already know about traditional backyard composting, but there are other options out there to help you recycle your organics at home. Today, I’ll cover some basics on two composting methods you may not have heard of yet: vermicomposting and bokashi.

Earlier this year, our Hotline Manager, Amanda, wanted to increase her composting knowledge, much like our Education Manager and Master Composter-in training, Erika. After taking a series of classes, Amanda wanted todreamstime_s_16107361 (2) share these two new methods that are great for small spaces. Read on to learn the basics of two innovative composting methods; perhaps you’ll find one that works for you! 

To Read the Full Article from I Love a Clean San Diego, CLICK HERE.