[1THING] Blog: Posts Tagged ‘food’

[ Green Your Tea During Hot Tea Month ]

HotTea-dreamstime_s_15742900January is National Hot Tea Month. To celebrate, here are a few tips to green your brew from the Sierra Club:

Buy loose-leaf tea: Opt for loose leaf tea over disposable tea bags, which use carbon-intensive packaging materials. Many tea bags also contain polypropylene mesh, which can take several years to degrade. Additionally, bagged tea is often machine processed, producing a larger carbon footprint than loose leaf tea, which tends to be hand-picked. If you do purchase tea bags, make sure they’re biodegradable and unbleached. Avoid bags with staples, strings, or tags.

Minimize your water footprint: Only pour enough water to fill your cup to avoid wasting energy boiling what you won’t drink anyway. If it’s safe, use local tap water to brew your tea.

Cold-brew your iced tea: It not only tastes sweeter and smoother than traditional hot-brewed iced tea, but it spares the energy needed to boil your water, relying mainly on an already-running appliance—your refrigerator.  To cold-brew your own iced tea, add about 1.5 times the amount of tea you’d normally use to a pitcher. Pour in cold water, add a lid, and let sit in the fridge for about 4-10 hours. White teas, green teas, and flat oolongs need less time to sit, while rolled oolongs require more time. Herbal infusions and black teas usually need to sit the full ten hours. Strain and enjoy.

Repurpose tea leaves: Most of us know to reuse tea leaves or tea bags for our next cup of tea, but their use extends beyond the kitchen. The high nitrogen content in tea leaves makes them the perfect plant food, which does double duty by helping repel insects and other pests. When transferring a plant to a pot, line the bottom of the pot with used tea bags before adding soil. The tea bags will help retain water and release nutrients into the potting medium.  Dried tea leaves also make fantastic deodorizers. Toss some in the litter box or dog house to remove pet odors. For all-over freshness, sprinkle and gently crush some dried leaves over your carpet. Wait about 10 minutes, then vacuum.

Choose eco-friendly labels: As you would with coffee, buy brands labeled “USDA organic” and “Fair Trade Certified.” To earn the USDA’s organic seal, farmers must not have used synthetic herbicides, pesticides, or fertilizers for at least three years. Meanwhile, although fair trade certification primarily ensures that farmers are paid a just price for their crop, it also has environmental side effects. In return for providing good working conditions and fair wages, producers get paid more for their tea. As a result, famers need less land to support themselves and their families, leaving more land available for natural habitat.

[ Yes We Canned ]

Catalina is now in the business of growing their own local tuna.dreamstime_s_80692229

Did you ever open a can of tuna and think, “This really resembles cat food.” Did you know that there has not been a single commercial tuna cannery in the U.S. since 1972? The Marine Mammal Protection Act passed—protecting whales, dolphins, seals, sea lions, walruses, manatees, etc. The legislation was a fantastic idea, protecting the lives of our friends in the sea, but also ended commercial tuna fishing in America. This really had an impact on the quality of the tuna we were consuming here in America. But…things are looking up for our tuna quality. Whole Foods is promising to only sell sustainable canned tuna by 2018. Some of the lowest quality tuna that was tested are among Target, Costco, Chicken of the Sea, Trader Joe’s, Bumble Bee, and Walmart. The lowest-rated on Greenpeace’s test was Starkist—the largest tuna brand in the U.S., and probably what most Americans have in their cupboard at home.

To read the rest of this very informative article from San Diego MagazineCLICK HERE. 

[ Instead of ban, San Diego will allow recycling of foam food containers ]

While many cities have banned the use of polystyrene food containers, on July 1st 2017, San Diego began allowing the recycling of said polystyrene. Sophie Barnhorst, a San Diego Chamber of Commerce Policy Coordinatordreamstime_s_69651160 stated, “We believe recycling expanded polystyrene food containers is a sensible alternative to an outright ban”.

To read the full article from the San Diego Union Tribune…CLICK HERE. 

[ November Feature: American Farmland Trust ]

No farms, no food. That’s the message of an organization called the American Farmland Trust.

35 years ago, visionary farmland conservationists founded American Farmland Trust.  It’s now part of a national movement to save the land, soil, water and people needed to feed America, and the world.

According to the organization, it’s an uphill battle. Every hour, more than 40 acres of farm or ranch land is lost to urban sprawl or development. Every year, 1.7 billion tons of topsoil is lost to erosion each year in the U.S. That’s enough to fill 1,200 Empire State buildings.

From the halls of Congress to local councils, the American Farmland Trust fights for programs and policies that protect farmland, food and the environment. By mobilizing partners and engaging citizens, they advocate for the changes needed to sustain America’s farmland and the farmers who grow our food.

Since AFT’s founding in 1980 by a group of farmers and citizens concerned about the rapid loss of farmland to development, the organization has helped save millions of acres of farmland, and led the way for establishing sound environmental practices on millions more.

Want to help? Find out more here. https://www.farmland.org/