[1THING] Blog: Archive for the ‘New’ Category

[ THE OCEAN CLEANUP ANNOUNCES PACIFIC CLEANUP TO START IN 2018 ]

The Dutch foundation is developing advanced technologies to completely rid our oceans of plastic. The first cleanup dreamstime_s_38944764systems are already in production. Overwhelmingly allowing for the cleanup of half the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in just 5 years. Now that’s pretty impressive.

Read the full article at Gogreenbiz by CLICKING HERE! 

[ Yes We Canned ]

Catalina is now in the business of growing their own local tuna.dreamstime_s_80692229

Did you ever open a can of tuna and think, “This really resembles cat food.” Did you know that there has not been a single commercial tuna cannery in the U.S. since 1972? The Marine Mammal Protection Act passed—protecting whales, dolphins, seals, sea lions, walruses, manatees, etc. The legislation was a fantastic idea, protecting the lives of our friends in the sea, but also ended commercial tuna fishing in America. This really had an impact on the quality of the tuna we were consuming here in America. But…things are looking up for our tuna quality. Whole Foods is promising to only sell sustainable canned tuna by 2018. Some of the lowest quality tuna that was tested are among Target, Costco, Chicken of the Sea, Trader Joe’s, Bumble Bee, and Walmart. The lowest-rated on Greenpeace’s test was Starkist—the largest tuna brand in the U.S., and probably what most Americans have in their cupboard at home.

To read the rest of this very informative article from San Diego MagazineCLICK HERE. 

[ 1THING Featured for October: Surfrider Foundation ]

Surfrider-Foundation_Logo-200pxThe Surfrider Foundation is dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the world’s ocean, waves and beaches through a powerful activist network.

Our ocean faces growing challenges from pollution, offshore development and climate change. At the same time, expanding industries, such as offshore oil drilling, threaten to crowd our ocean and degrade its health (and those who call it home!).

Every day poses new threats to our oceans and beaches. Our ocean and special places must be proactively protected before they are threatened and stem the tide before further damage is done to the ocean’s health.

This is precisely why Surfrider has built a network of passion-driven people who are on the ground and are the voice for our ocean and beaches. With one foot in the sand and the other in the water, Surfrider is the only non-profit organization who is 100% focused on our coasts.

Visit Surfrider.org to find out more and to donate now!

[ A Sustainable Solution To Water Supply Challenges ]

Because San Diego lacks a local drinking water source, we import 85% of our water from the Colorado River and Northern California Bay Delta. Due to that and droughts, San Diego falls victim to rising water costs from dreamstime_s_40503571wholesalers. The cost of water has tripled over the last 15 years and does not show signs of dropping. In fact it is currently getting even higher. What do we do? We obviously need water to live.

The city of San Diego has launched Pure Water San Diego. This is a program to help manage our own existing water supply and uses advanced water purification technologies to recycle wastewater into safe, high-quality drinking water. In essence it’s basically recycling our own water…how brilliant is that? Although this is a remarkable step forward in water preservation, reaching the goal of producing approximately one-third of San Diego’s water supply by 2035 isn’t a cheap endeavor. The bill for just the first phase is a healthy $1.2 billion.

To read the rest of this article from Brookings…CLICK HERE. 

[ 91% of Plastic Isn’t Recycled ]

When talking about non recylcled plastic, even 1% is too much – but 91%! That is just sad.

Beginning 6 decades ago and since then, 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic have been created as disposable products, which end up in the trash.  Of all that plastic waste, only 9% has been recycled!dreamstime_s_36934615

Jenna Jambeck is a University of Georgia environmental engineer who specializes in studying plastic waste in the oceans and she says, “We all knew there was a rapid and extreme increase in plastic production from 1950 until now, but actually quantifying the cumulative number for all plastic ever made was quite shocking.”

To Read this full story and see the video from National Geographic…CLICK HERE! 

[ Help Save Endangered Sea Turtles ]

dreamstime_s_17043206Extinction is not a new concept.

In fact, species have been going extinct for millions of years from geological and climate changes. The issue now is from overconsumption, pollution, and habitat destruction brought on by humans causing more species to needlessly become extinct.

So why should we care about sea turtles extinction in particular?

For starters, sea turtles help maintain the health of sea grass by eating it. Healthy sea grass allows other oceanic species such as crustaceans, fish, and shellfish to be able to breed. This would impact a huge source of food for humans.

In addition, when sea turtles lay eggs in dunes, the shells and unhatched eggs left behind provide nutrients that facilitate vegetation growth. This strengthens the beach’s ecosystem as a whole and helps prevent erosion.

So help save sea turtles around the world by donating or purchasing some adorable sea turtle pillows here:

http://costaricaturtles.com/how-to-help/

Donation not enough for you? You can always become an alliance partner!

For more information, visit: http://costaricaturtles.com/

[ Instead of ban, San Diego will allow recycling of foam food containers ]

While many cities have banned the use of polystyrene food containers, on July 1st 2017, San Diego began allowing the recycling of said polystyrene. Sophie Barnhorst, a San Diego Chamber of Commerce Policy Coordinatordreamstime_s_69651160 stated, “We believe recycling expanded polystyrene food containers is a sensible alternative to an outright ban”.

To read the full article from the San Diego Union Tribune…CLICK HERE. 

[ How to Recycle and Donate Your Leftover Eclipse Glasses ]

Well the total eclipse has come and gone. Hopefully you were lucky enough to see it and if you did, you hopefully saw it through approved eclipse glasses. Now that you’ve experienced this amazing event, what to do with dreamstime_s_54693549those glasses?

Lifehacker.com has instructions on how to appropriately recycle your eclipse glasses.

To find out how…CLICK HERE! 

[ What is Fairtrade? ]

If you are anything like me, l had heard the phrase Fairtrade, but didn’t really know what it meant. I knew it had something to do with helping the environment but that was about the extent of my knowledge. Fair trade isdreamstime_s_85080660 (2) a far overlooked concept that if practiced, could make a huge difference in the world we live in.

When purchasing fairtrade coffee for instance, it can mean five times the pay for a farmer vs. child labor. Through Fairtrade, farmers and workers take control and build sustainable futures for themselves, their families, and their communities.

Fairtrade America states…”The difference between “Fairtrade” and “fair trade” is that “Fairtrade” refers only to Fairtrade organizations (such as Fairtrade America) or products certified through the Fairtrade International system. Conversely, “fair trade” can refer to many different things – the fair trade movement, fair trade products generally, products that claim to be fairly traded but do not carry the FAIRTRADE Mark.”

To read a very informative and interesting article from Fairtrade America….CLICK HERE!

[ San Diego Coastkeeper Releases 2016 Water Quality Report ]

WaterQuality-dreamstimeSAN DIEGO, August 1, 2017— This week, San Diego Coastkeeper, an organization protecting and restoring San Diego County’s fishable, swimmable, drinkable water, published its 2016 San Diego County Water Quality Report. The organization’s data show an overall improvement in San Diego’s water quality for the first time since 2013.

“This is great news. Of course, a single year of overall better water quality readings does not mean San Diego’s water will keep improving. It takes many years for patterns to emerge,” says San Diego Coastkeeper Lab Manager Meredith Meyers. “That’s why our long-term water monitoring is so crucial. We can provide decision-makers with the big picture and that makes for more effective, data-based policy.”

Urban runoff continues to be the largest factor impacting people’s ability to safely fish and swim in San Diego County. Rain takes pollution from the surfaces of our streets into our storm drains, where it travels through to our rivers and streams and ultimately, to the Pacific Ocean. As a result, the overwhelming majority of San Diego’s waterways fail to the meet water quality standards that make them safe for recreation.

Though the cause of last year’s improved results can’t be directly identified, and Coastkeeper scientists caution against giving too much credit to any one theory, there are a few ideas about why water quality looked a little better in 2016.

“Temporary water conservation regulations, implemented in response to the drought, may have helped water quality improve. When San Diegans prioritize conservation over lush lawns, reduced fertilizer use and fewer lawn sprinklers overflowing onto sidewalks means less pollution washing from the street into our rivers and streams,” says Meyers. “It’s impossible to know for sure, but it’s one idea that makes sense.”

San Diego Coastkeeper collects monthly water quality data from across the County through its volunteer-powered Water Quality Monitoring program. The program, which is the largest of its kind in California, trains citizen scientists to collect vital water quality data to fill gaps and increase the amount of publically available data.. In 2016, 152 trained volunteers gave a collective 1,908 hours.

“Our Water Quality Monitors are more dedicated than ever. Participation was so consistent last year we were able to reduce the number of new volunteers we needed to bring on board to maintain the program,” says Meyers. “The dedication of our trained monitors has allowed us to put even more resources straight into the monitoring itself, and has improved the program as a whole.”

The organization uses a suite of indicators to calculate an overall 2016 Water Quality Score for different watersheds across San Diego County. For the first time since 2013, some of San Diego County’s watersheds surpassed the “Fair” rating on the Water Quality Index,” reaching “Good.” Each watershed below is linked to more details about the watershed’s 2016 water quality:

  • San Luis Rey                      82     Good
  • Buena Vista                        78     Fair
  • San Marcos (Batiquitos)      79     Fair
  • Escondido Creek                 72     Fair
  • Peñasquitos                       76     Fair
  • Rose Creek                           87     Good
  • San Dieguito                       78     Fair
  • San Diego                          72     Fair
  • Pueblo                                56     Marginal
  • Sweetwater                         74     Fair (20 percent improvement from 2015)
  • Otay                                70     Fair
  • Tijuana                                   N/A   (unsafe to test because of sewage contamination)

“Every year, our results continue to show that water quality is defined by all of us. There’s no single source of pollution poisoning our environment; it’s all of our daily actions that determine our water quality,” says Meyers. “Whenever you pick up a piece of litter, fix a leaky sprinkler or forgo chemical fertilizers in your garden, you make a real impact. We all have the opportunity to take small actions that matter.”

After each month’s water sampling, San Diego Coastkeeper updates its online, color-coded water quality map. See June 2017’s water quality results.

Read the full water quality report for 2016 here.

As a trained Water Quality Monitor, volunteers can learn how to generate vital, scientifically sound data to better inform decision-makers and the public. Visit San Diego Coastkeeper’s website to learn more, sign up for training, to view the 2017 water quality-monitoring schedule and to donate to help the organization continue doing this important work.

 

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San Diego Coastkeeper

Founded in 1995, San Diego Coastkeeper protects and restores fishable, swimmable and drinkable waters in San Diego County. For more information, visit San Diego Coastkeeper online at http://www.sdcoastkeeper.org.