[1THING] Blog: Archive for the ‘New’ Category

[ Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation ]

In 2015, San Diego WON the Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge and we’d like to retake our crown! The contest this year starts on April 1 and ends April 30, encouraging San Diego residents to sign up in order to save or conserve water. To sign up and read more about this, go to Wylandfoundation.org.

Residents from more than 4,800 cities across the United States took part in the 2017 Wyland National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation, April 1-30, by pledging todreamstime_s_62758794 save over 2.2 billion gallons of water over the next year. The annual month-long campaign to promote drought resiliency and water quality ended on April 30 with mayors from 38 states vying to see whose city could be the nation’s most “water wise.”

The cities with the highest percentage of residents making pledges during the campaign , including our very own San Diego, CA are Laguna Beach, Calif., Flagstaff, Ariz., Athens, Ga, Aurora, Colo., and Dallas, Texas. Overall, residents around the nation, from Anchorage to the Florida Keys, made 421,891 pledges to change behaviors ranging from fixing home leaks to reducing harmful runoff into local rivers and streams.

The challenge, presented by the Wyland Foundation and Toyota, with support from the U.S EPA, National League of Cities, The Toro Company, Earth Friendly Products – maker of ECOS, and Conserva Irrigation, addresses the growing importance of educating consumers about the many ways they use water.

“This year’s challenge took a hard look at things we can all do to reduce our impact on our lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands,” said marine life artist Wyland, who founded the Wyland Foundation in 1993. “The more we can do to reduce harmful runoff into our water systems, the more we can provide long-term sustainable benefits to our communities.”

 

 

[ Recycling At Work ]

We all do out best at home to recycle the best that we can, but how about at work? How do you get everyone at workdreamstime_s_89192143 on board with helping to preserve our precious planet?

First of all you must be able to identify what to recycle. Start by looking in refuse bins at different locations around your premises. For a more accurate picture, you could even conduct a waste review. Once you see what’s going into the normal refuse bins, you can start a list of things that should be separated from normal trash. Once you do that, how do you get everyone to chip in?

One of the first things you should do to get everyone to do their part to get senior management involved. It’s important to get them on it first off. They are going to be the ones sending out the messages and spending the money. Unless you plan on paying a recycling service out of your own pocket, it’s essential to get management on board.

For some really great ideas on how you can recycle at work, read at recyclenow.com

[ Permanent Water Use Restrictions in San Diego ]

The lack of water in San Diego is no joke. Sure we have warm beach weather, but the reality of San Diego drying up isdreamstime_s_69230872 far too real.  It’s always a good idea to refresh yourself with way you can conserve our much needed water.

The city of San Diego website has very specific water conservation guidelines.

  • Customers shall not wash down sidewalks, driveways, parking areas, tennis courts, or other paved areas without using a power washer or a hose with a shutoff nozzle.  Washing any paved areas is only allowed to alleviate immediate safety or sanitation hazards.  Water shall be collected and prevented from leaving the property and entering the municipal separate storm sewer system.
  • Customers shall not overfill swimming pools and spas.
  • Customers shall not use non-recirculating potable water in ornamental fountains or cascading fountains.
  • Customers shall not use a hose that dispenses potable water to wash a motor vehicle, except where the hose is fitted with a shut-off nozzle or device attached to it that causes it to cease dispensing water immediately when not in use.

Visit the City of San Diego website for more ways you can save our precious water.

 

[ Green Your Tea During Hot Tea Month ]

HotTea-dreamstime_s_15742900January is National Hot Tea Month. To celebrate, here are a few tips to green your brew from the Sierra Club:

Buy loose-leaf tea: Opt for loose leaf tea over disposable tea bags, which use carbon-intensive packaging materials. Many tea bags also contain polypropylene mesh, which can take several years to degrade. Additionally, bagged tea is often machine processed, producing a larger carbon footprint than loose leaf tea, which tends to be hand-picked. If you do purchase tea bags, make sure they’re biodegradable and unbleached. Avoid bags with staples, strings, or tags.

Minimize your water footprint: Only pour enough water to fill your cup to avoid wasting energy boiling what you won’t drink anyway. If it’s safe, use local tap water to brew your tea.

Cold-brew your iced tea: It not only tastes sweeter and smoother than traditional hot-brewed iced tea, but it spares the energy needed to boil your water, relying mainly on an already-running appliance—your refrigerator.  To cold-brew your own iced tea, add about 1.5 times the amount of tea you’d normally use to a pitcher. Pour in cold water, add a lid, and let sit in the fridge for about 4-10 hours. White teas, green teas, and flat oolongs need less time to sit, while rolled oolongs require more time. Herbal infusions and black teas usually need to sit the full ten hours. Strain and enjoy.

Repurpose tea leaves: Most of us know to reuse tea leaves or tea bags for our next cup of tea, but their use extends beyond the kitchen. The high nitrogen content in tea leaves makes them the perfect plant food, which does double duty by helping repel insects and other pests. When transferring a plant to a pot, line the bottom of the pot with used tea bags before adding soil. The tea bags will help retain water and release nutrients into the potting medium.  Dried tea leaves also make fantastic deodorizers. Toss some in the litter box or dog house to remove pet odors. For all-over freshness, sprinkle and gently crush some dried leaves over your carpet. Wait about 10 minutes, then vacuum.

Choose eco-friendly labels: As you would with coffee, buy brands labeled “USDA organic” and “Fair Trade Certified.” To earn the USDA’s organic seal, farmers must not have used synthetic herbicides, pesticides, or fertilizers for at least three years. Meanwhile, although fair trade certification primarily ensures that farmers are paid a just price for their crop, it also has environmental side effects. In return for providing good working conditions and fair wages, producers get paid more for their tea. As a result, famers need less land to support themselves and their families, leaving more land available for natural habitat.

[ THE OCEAN CLEANUP ANNOUNCES PACIFIC CLEANUP TO START IN 2018 ]

The Dutch foundation is developing advanced technologies to completely rid our oceans of plastic. The first cleanup dreamstime_s_38944764systems are already in production. Overwhelmingly allowing for the cleanup of half the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in just 5 years. Now that’s pretty impressive.

Read the full article at Gogreenbiz by CLICKING HERE! 

[ Yes We Canned ]

Catalina is now in the business of growing their own local tuna.dreamstime_s_80692229

Did you ever open a can of tuna and think, “This really resembles cat food.” Did you know that there has not been a single commercial tuna cannery in the U.S. since 1972? The Marine Mammal Protection Act passed—protecting whales, dolphins, seals, sea lions, walruses, manatees, etc. The legislation was a fantastic idea, protecting the lives of our friends in the sea, but also ended commercial tuna fishing in America. This really had an impact on the quality of the tuna we were consuming here in America. But…things are looking up for our tuna quality. Whole Foods is promising to only sell sustainable canned tuna by 2018. Some of the lowest quality tuna that was tested are among Target, Costco, Chicken of the Sea, Trader Joe’s, Bumble Bee, and Walmart. The lowest-rated on Greenpeace’s test was Starkist—the largest tuna brand in the U.S., and probably what most Americans have in their cupboard at home.

To read the rest of this very informative article from San Diego MagazineCLICK HERE. 

[ 1THING Featured for October: Surfrider Foundation ]

Surfrider-Foundation_Logo-200pxThe Surfrider Foundation is dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the world’s ocean, waves and beaches through a powerful activist network.

Our ocean faces growing challenges from pollution, offshore development and climate change. At the same time, expanding industries, such as offshore oil drilling, threaten to crowd our ocean and degrade its health (and those who call it home!).

Every day poses new threats to our oceans and beaches. Our ocean and special places must be proactively protected before they are threatened and stem the tide before further damage is done to the ocean’s health.

This is precisely why Surfrider has built a network of passion-driven people who are on the ground and are the voice for our ocean and beaches. With one foot in the sand and the other in the water, Surfrider is the only non-profit organization who is 100% focused on our coasts.

Visit Surfrider.org to find out more and to donate now!

[ A Sustainable Solution To Water Supply Challenges ]

Because San Diego lacks a local drinking water source, we import 85% of our water from the Colorado River and Northern California Bay Delta. Due to that and droughts, San Diego falls victim to rising water costs from dreamstime_s_40503571wholesalers. The cost of water has tripled over the last 15 years and does not show signs of dropping. In fact it is currently getting even higher. What do we do? We obviously need water to live.

The city of San Diego has launched Pure Water San Diego. This is a program to help manage our own existing water supply and uses advanced water purification technologies to recycle wastewater into safe, high-quality drinking water. In essence it’s basically recycling our own water…how brilliant is that? Although this is a remarkable step forward in water preservation, reaching the goal of producing approximately one-third of San Diego’s water supply by 2035 isn’t a cheap endeavor. The bill for just the first phase is a healthy $1.2 billion.

To read the rest of this article from Brookings…CLICK HERE. 

[ 91% of Plastic Isn’t Recycled ]

When talking about non recylcled plastic, even 1% is too much – but 91%! That is just sad.

Beginning 6 decades ago and since then, 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic have been created as disposable products, which end up in the trash.  Of all that plastic waste, only 9% has been recycled!dreamstime_s_36934615

Jenna Jambeck is a University of Georgia environmental engineer who specializes in studying plastic waste in the oceans and she says, “We all knew there was a rapid and extreme increase in plastic production from 1950 until now, but actually quantifying the cumulative number for all plastic ever made was quite shocking.”

To Read this full story and see the video from National Geographic…CLICK HERE! 

[ Help Save Endangered Sea Turtles ]

dreamstime_s_17043206Extinction is not a new concept.

In fact, species have been going extinct for millions of years from geological and climate changes. The issue now is from overconsumption, pollution, and habitat destruction brought on by humans causing more species to needlessly become extinct.

So why should we care about sea turtles extinction in particular?

For starters, sea turtles help maintain the health of sea grass by eating it. Healthy sea grass allows other oceanic species such as crustaceans, fish, and shellfish to be able to breed. This would impact a huge source of food for humans.

In addition, when sea turtles lay eggs in dunes, the shells and unhatched eggs left behind provide nutrients that facilitate vegetation growth. This strengthens the beach’s ecosystem as a whole and helps prevent erosion.

So help save sea turtles around the world by donating or purchasing some adorable sea turtle pillows here:

http://costaricaturtles.com/how-to-help/

Donation not enough for you? You can always become an alliance partner!

For more information, visit: http://costaricaturtles.com/